Lobbyist for lobbyists steps away

Government relations group ends contract with former president, eyes new representation

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The American League of Lobbyists has terminated its lobbying contract with Marlowe & Company, the firm run by Howard Marlowe, the league's former president, new documents filed with the U.S. Senate indicate.

The parting is mutual and amicable, officials at both the League and Marlowe & Company tell the Center for Public Integrity. The contract termination was effective Dec. 31, the filing indicates.

In addition to Marlowe, Marlowe & Company staffers Michael Willis, a former senior legislative assistant to Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., and Joel Porter, a former aide to ex-Rep. Dennis Moore, D-Kansas, will also step away from representing the League.

"Howard's termination is just part of his not being president of ALL anymore," said Danielle Staudt, the League's executive director. "He's still the immediate past president and a member."

Staudt added that it plans to tap the firm run by its new president, Monte Ward, to represent the League.

So why does a group of lobbyists need lobbyists anyway?

In 2012, Marlowe's firm lobbied on "lobbying reform," "lobbying disclosure," "campaign finance laws and regulations" and "gift rules" among other issues and bills, according to its congressional disclosures. Both houses of Congress, as well as the White House and Vice President Joe Biden's office, were targets of its efforts.

Most of Marlowe & Company's clients are municipal governments and other public entities.

Why is 2013 an important year for campaign finance? Dave Levinthal and Michael Beckel will answer that, and many other questions about the money-in-politics world in a live chat on Monday, Feb. 4, at 1 p.m. ET.