R. Jeffrey Smith

Managing Editor, National Security  The Center for Public Integrity

Smith worked for 25 years in a series of key reporting and editorial roles at The Washington Post, including national investigative editor, national security correspondent, national investigative correspondent, and a foreign staff bureau chief based in Rome. In 2006, he won the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting, along with two colleagues at the Post, for articles on House Majority Leader Tom DeLay and lobbyist Jack Abramoff. Smith was also a finalist with other Post reporters for the Pulitzer Prize in international reporting in 1999 (from Kosovo), and a finalist with others for the Pulitzer Prize in national reporting in 2005 (about Abu Ghraib and military prisoner abuse). In his first ten years at the Post, Smith wrote about defense, intelligence and foreign policy matters, including policymaking at the State Department, Pentagon, and White House. He also focused on conflict and terrorism in the Middle East; politics and military affairs in Asia; and arms proliferation. Prior to that, he was a senior writer for the News and Comment section of Science Magazine where he won a National Magazine Award in 1986 for writing about arms control.

A new report from an arms tracking group highlights how easily munitions shipped to the Middle East shift from one owner to another.

A growing number of U.S. experts say that feigning ignorance about Israel’s nuclear arsenal creates more trouble than it averts.

One worker's high productivity fails to win plaudits.

Analysts again say the Defense and Energy Departments have wrongly omitted billions of dollars from their forecasts.

A report by the Joint Chiefs of Staff says that both military and civilian officials failed to tackle corrosive corruption.

The Air Force is having difficulties fielding missile officers who are not engaged in drug use, test cheating and deliberate disobedience.

Cronyism, influence-buying and a stifling of dissenting voices have kept the Japanese nuclear industry going strong after Fukushima.

Japan is leading a global move towards dangerous reactors fueled by a nuclear explosive, Thomas Cochran and other experts say.

Japan has balked at U.S. security advice for its nuclear plants.

The costliest U.S. nonproliferation program has been undone by huge cost overruns.

The MOX plant may cost another $30 billion to complete and operate, and federal officials are newly wary.

Auditor says a program in Afghanistan costing hundreds of millions of dollars has been undermined by poor contracts and weak monitoring.

A court filing alleges that a Virginia firm failed to vet files properly for hundreds of thousands of federal clearance-holders

The ICBM force is not getting the Air Force’s high flyers.

A costly and ambitious U.S. effort to curtail Afghanistan's poppy production falters as U.S. forces draw down.

An independent report projects a much higher bill for the administration’s weapons programs.

Those on Capitol Hill who approve and oversee military intelligence spending benefit from a stream of industry campaign funding.

Auditors cannot account for many spare parts purchased for the Afghanistan Army.

Report says agency employees have snooped on spouses and girlfriends.

The U.S. military is widely using a security system that lets felons onto its bases.

There’s a reason why Western officials are being nice to Moscow now — they want Russia to destroy Syria’s deadly arsenal on its own soil.

Test your nuclear targeting aptitude.

USAID commissioned two reports that raised red flags about aid to Afghanistan’s Ministry of Health but decided to keep spending millions.

Obama's plan embraces cuts that Moscow remains reticent to endorse.

PART FOUR IN A SERIES: After DOE spends $3.7 billion on a troubled fuel plant, an alternative plan suddenly gains new advocates.

PART THREE IN A SERIES: Lawmakers shed their fiscal conservatism to keep a troubled nuclear plant alive at Washington’s expense.

PART TWO OF A SERIES: A yawning gap opens between Washington’s claims about a nuclear plant and its messy construction.

PART ONE OF A SERIES: More than a decade of negotiations with Russia produced a clear winner, and it was not the United States.

Another DOE security squad passes performance exams with improper, inside help

Payments from countries hosting U.S. troops are diverted to questionable projects, according to Senate report.

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