Chris Hamby

Reporter  The Center for Public Integrity

Chris Hamby’s series Breathless and Burdened, describing how the coal industry beat back miners' claims for black lung health benefits, was awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting. The series was also honored with the Harvard Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting and the White House Correspondents' Association Award, his second such honor. Hamby's reporting on the environment and labor has been recognized with awards from the National Press Foundation, the Society of Professional Journalists and the National Association of Science Writers, among others. He has twice been a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists, as well as a finalist for awards from Harvard University, Investigative Reporters and Editors, the Society of Environmental Journalists and the Scripps Howard Foundation. His work includes computer-assisted reporting, and he previously worked at the National Institute for Computer-Assisted Reporting’s database library. He has a master’s degree in journalism with a concentration in investigative reporting from the University of Missouri and a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Richmond. In 2010, he completed a yearlong examination of a controversial murder case, supported in part by an investigative reporting fellowship. His writing about policy, politics, the criminal justice system and public health has appeared online and in newspapers and magazines.

Black lung opinions by Dr. Paul Wheeler of Johns Hopkins should be assumed to lack credibility, senators are told at a hearing.

Move is a direct response to disclosures that lawyers kept key evidence from sick miners, which caused some to lose benefits cases.

Surrounded by coal miners, U.S. Labor officials announce reforms including a new rule limiting the disease-causing dust allowed in mines.

A new government study supports reducing the dust limit workers encounter in mines; the industry is pushing back against stronger rules.

The EPA's "Next Generation Compliance" plan would lead to fewer inspections of, and enforcement actions against, polluters.

Following the series Breathless and Burdened, U.S. officials unveil a series of initiatives to create a level playing field for coal miners.

A last-minute change to a public meeting on a 2010 explosion at the Tesoro refinery in Washington State has board members "embarrassed."

Massive chemical spill in W.Va. adds to a growing backlog for the troubled Chemical Safety Board.

Coal law firm's withholding of evidence not "fraud on the court," appeals court rules, shifting long-standing battle to West Virginia.

IMPACT: Two congressmen called on the Labor Department's IG to investigate whether miners have been wrongfully denied benefits.

IMPACT: Citing a Center-ABC investigation, U.S. senators are leading an effort to reform the nation's black lung benefits system.

IMPACT: Following a Center-ABC investigation, Johns Hopkins announced Friday it was suspending its black lung program, pending a review.

A congressman's words 44 years ago, citing the coal industry's efforts to limit its liability for black lung, resonate anew.

Gathered in a hospital in southwestern Virginia, miners wait their turn for a black lung exam by a doctor chosen by the coal company.

Ted Latusek's course through the legal maze of the black lung benefits system.

A newly recognized form of lung disease is emerging among miners — prompting the coal industry's latest pushback against benefit claims.

Doctors from Johns Hopkins University charge a premium for X-ray readings.

Examine an X-ray from a miner with black lung.

Reporter Chris Hamby details his yearlong look at miners suffering from black lung disease, and their struggle for benefits.

A surprising force has helped industry defeat black lung benefits claims for ailing miners: Johns Hopkins University.

Our yearlong investigative project examining how coal companies defeat sick miners' black lung benefits claims begins tomorrow.

Today, an appeals court will hear arguments in a case with potential implications for how law firms handle evidence in black lung cases.

A law firm with a healthy black lung practice gets blasted in court decisions and emails.

Reports hidden in black lung cases.

In part 1 of a series, the Center details how a major law firm withheld evidence of black lung, helping defeat miners' claims for benefits.

A doctor rarely finds black lung.

A backlog of Chemical Safety Board investigations hinders the agency's ability to help prevent future accidents, a new IG report concludes.

Chemical industry groups are pursuing hearings and legal fights challenging a government cancer report — part of a growing rift with HHS.

IMPACT: Companies exempted from some safety inspections under an OSHA program will face automatic removal after work-related deaths.

An exemption carved out two decades ago allows some fertilizer and other chemical facilities to skirt stricter rules and inspections.

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