Chris Young

Reporter  The Center for Public Integrity

Chris Young is a reporter for the Center’s Consider the Source project, where he covers Washington, D.C.’s “misinformation industry.” Before joining the Center as an American University Fellow in September 2012, he worked for five years as a reporter for Pittsburgh City Paper, the Steel City’s alternative weekly newspaper. A staffer since he graduated from Duquesne University in 2007, Chris covered education, neighborhoods and politics for the paper. A number of his stories won first-place awards from the Press Club of Western Pennsylvania, including an investigative piece that revealed problematic billing practices at the Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority and a story that documented the difficulties of diagnosing and treating bipolar disorder in children. Chris earned his master’s degree in journalism and public affairs from American University in August 2013.

Initiative spearheaded by billionaire brothers paints positive portrait of free-market system.

U.S. appeals court reopened foreclosure case after Center uncovered that a judge owned stock in Wells Fargo, court reaches same decision.

Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reopens 2007 case after Center alerts judge that his wife owned ExxonMobil stock when he ruled on case.

Federal judge who attended Koch-funded conferences halts campaign finance investigation into Wisconsin group with Koch ties.

Judges who may decide fates of public pension reform disputes to attend seminar sponsored by pro-business interests.

Judges acknowledge conflicts of interest Center found in 26 cases.

More than 40 percent of federal appellate judges had portions of financial disclosures blacked out.

A database of investments, outside income, gifts and other disclosures.

Local judicial commission mulls disclosure reforms after Center for Public Integrity investigation on judges' finances.

See the library of documents we used in our 'Justice Obscured' investigation.

Officials defend limited financial disclosure for high court judges.

We graded 50 states (plus D.C.) on their judicial financial disclosures — how did your state do?

See the nine justices we found who ruled on their own financial interests.

The Center's methodology for grading states on supreme court financial disclosure

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

Despite universally poor disclosure rules, Center finds numerous conflicts among state high court judges.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

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