Dave Levinthal

Senior reporter  The Center for Public Integrity

Dave Levinthal joined the Center for Public Integrity in 2013 and leads its Consider the Source project team investigating the influence of money in federal politics. For two years prior to joining the Center, Dave reported on campaign finance and lobbying issues for Politico and co-wrote the daily Politico Influence column. He also edited OpenSecrets.org from 2009 to 2011, where he led coverage that won the Online News Association’s top honors in 2011 for best topical reporting and blogging and was a finalist the same year for the Scripps Howard Foundation’s Distinguished Service to the First Amendment award. From 2003 to 2009, Dave worked for The Dallas Morning News, primarily covering Dallas City Hall also reporting on national elections and aviation security. From 2000 to 2002, he covered the New Hampshire Statehouse for The Eagle-Tribune of Lawrence, Mass. A native of Buffalo, N.Y., Dave graduated from Syracuse University with degrees in newspaper journalism and political philosophy and edited The Daily Orange. He is also a two-time winner of Canada’s Northern Lights Award for his travel writing about the arctic.

North Carolina's U.S. Senate race is the nation's nastiest — and few are particularly friendly affairs.

Several political committees that materialized in recent days aren't required to reveal donors until after Election Day.

More than seven in 10 U.S. Senate-focused television ads last week attacked or criticized a political candidate.

Vice Chairwoman Ann Ravel will criss-cross the country in bid to boost her agency's profile and tout merits of disclosure.

Liberals aired more TV ads last week than their conservative foils in seven of the nine top Senate battlegrounds races.

Gabriel S. Joseph III's past political efforts include an anti-Obama spam text message campaign that prompted legal complaints.

Some well-known brands keep their political spending secret while others are more forthcoming, new survey shows.

A guide to our political TV ad trackers.

Federal regulators convince a pro-Elizabeth Warren super PAC to change its name.

Proposed gift from Koch foundation to Florida State University in 2007 came with strings attached.

The nation's election regulator is telling an upstart super PAC to change its name, saying it violates federal law.

Big-spending Mayday PAC giving Jim Rubens an unexpected boost — and Scott Brown a headache — ahead of GOP primary.

Nine big-money Senate races will determine whether Republicans control both chambers of Congress.

Ahead of high-stakes battle for the Senate, Democrats create massive fundraising group blessed by contentious 'McCutcheon' decision.

Despite efforts to beef up laws regulating lobbyists, public is in the dark when it comes to what firms are up to in Washington.

Hourly pay of four figures is possible at one D.C. firm, court filings show.

Outside groups are using the power of positivity to help save career of Kansas' longtime U.S. senator.

Office of Congressional Ethics investigates House members' campaign shenanigans more than any other alleged violation.

Three-fifths of nation's top 100 lobbying entities spent less on influence in the second quarter compared to a year ago.

Media and public wait for information from election agency as Congress seeks IRS-related information.

The numbers behind the IRS nonprofit breakdown

Requests for election law rulings plummet as ideological gridlock envelops commission.

Senator's supporters suddenly turn cheery in final bid to save Mississippi mainstay's job.

Agency that enforces campaign laws has gone without a general counsel for nearly a year — and counting.

The conservative billionaire's massive grant to United Negro College Fund is nothing new.

Cochran and McDaniel prepare to square off again June 24 as outside groups spend millions in GOP's contested Senate primary.

Party official: Republicans to file an FEC complaint about the Democratic congressman's pro bono legal aid.

Pro-Clinton super PAC has converted itself into a hybrid PAC, allowing it to also donate directly to political candidates.

If Democrat Evan Bayh runs for governor, he could tap nearly $10 million parked in his old Senate campaign account.

What happens to campaign money of former congressional candidates? It often sits in accounts for years.

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