Dave Levinthal

Senior reporter  The Center for Public Integrity

Dave Levinthal joined the Center for Public Integrity in 2013 and leads its Consider the Source project team investigating the influence of money in federal politics. For two years prior to joining the Center, Dave reported on campaign finance and lobbying issues for Politico and co-wrote the daily Politico Influence column. He also edited OpenSecrets.org from 2009 to 2011, where he led coverage that won the Online News Association’s top honors in 2011 for best topical reporting and blogging and was a finalist the same year for the Scripps Howard Foundation’s Distinguished Service to the First Amendment award. From 2003 to 2009, Dave worked for The Dallas Morning News, primarily covering Dallas City Hall also reporting on national elections and aviation security. From 2000 to 2002, he covered the New Hampshire Statehouse for The Eagle-Tribune of Lawrence, Mass. A native of Buffalo, N.Y., Dave graduated from Syracuse University with degrees in newspaper journalism and political philosophy and edited The Daily Orange. He is also a two-time winner of Canada’s Northern Lights Award for his travel writing about the arctic.

FEC says Texas-based group that won't file disclosures is violating the law.

Agency hamstrung by political bickering, case backlogs, staff departures — even Chinese hackers.

Two nominees to the Election Assistance Commission languish in limbo as Congress dithers over its future.

Some government influencers wish the Association of Government Relations Professionals had kept its old name.

Long live the 'government relations professional'.

The American League of Lobbyists will now go by Association of Government Relations Professionals.

Debt-riddled ex-Rep. John E. Sweeney, R-N.Y., failing to comply with reporting requirements, agency says.

Jailed ex-congressmen Jesse Jackson Jr., William Jefferson must still file disclosure reports, agency says.

Letter from U.S. Chamber, others charge Center for Political Accountability with laying 'disclosure trap' for corporations.

But third-quarter expenditures are down for many special interests.

Politicos on both sides see the government shutdown and looming default as an opportunity to raise campaign cash.

Idled FEC is recalling furloughed workers to fix computer crashes that shut down key disclosure databases.

Democratic U.S. Senate hopeful has derided outside money but is greatly benefiting from it.

Federal Election Commission Chairwoman Ellen Weintraub details how government shutdown is affecting her agency.

All employees of election agency would be furloughed — save for commissioners themselves.

Politicians in both parties are filling their coffers off of the looming government shutdown and Obamacare funding showdown.

Study: Companies are increasingly volunteering information about their politicking, but 'severe' gaps remain.

The U.S. Senate approves Obama's Federal Election Commission picks by unanimous consent.

Political committee tells federal regulators to take a hike when prompted to change its name.

Political committee is pushing legal limits by naming itself after House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

Senate Rules Committee endorses nominations of Lee Goodman, Ann Ravel

Obama's two new picks for elections agency must wait a little longer to learn their fate.
Mitt Romney

FEC questions former GOP presidential nominee about contributions from Egyptian billionaire.

Federal agency again accuses Gingrich presidential committee of numerous disclosure failures.

PAC based at Texas virtual office has not submitted an FEC report since its launch a year ago.

Senate Rules Committee scheduled to vote in early September.

Once mighty political committees are failing to reinvent themselves in 2013.

Corporations are still mostly mum about political contributions, but more and more are reporting donations to secretive nonprofits.

The nonprofit National Association for Gun Rights spent $3 million lobbying last quarter, far more than the better-known NRA.

Special interest super PACs and nonprofits from D.C. region poured millions into special elections.

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