Douglas Birch

The Center for Public Integrity

Veteran foreign correspondent Douglas Birch has reported from more than 20 countries, covered four wars, a dozen elections, the death of a pope and the hunt for a malaria vaccine. He formerly served as the Moscow bureau chief for the Associated Press and spent 22 years at the Baltimore SunBirch was the AP’s diplomatic and military editor in Washington, following his work in Moscow from 2001 to 2005 and from 2007 to 2010. At the Baltimore Sun, he was an enterprise, feature and science writer. Birch was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2002 for his series on the abuse of human subjects in drug trials. A graduate of Columbia University and its graduate journalism school, he was also a Knight science journalism fellow at MIT. Birch lives in Baltimore with his wife, Jane, who works for a Baltimore charitable foundation. His daughter Alison is an architect living in Charleston, S.C.  

Former Energy Department official wins huge pay raise after moving to firm with deep ties to DOE

By Douglas Birch and Alexander Cohen

The projected cost of the government's most expensive nonproliferation effort rises again

By Douglas Birch

A break-in at a South African nuclear complex alarms Washington and strains relations years later

By Douglas Birch and R. Jeffrey Smith

Navy should develop new ship and sub reactors that don’t use weapons-grade uranium, experts say

By Douglas Birch

Surprise at the diplomatic discord between Washington and Pretoria

By Douglas Birch

South African who attacked a nuclear plant is a hero to his government and fellow citizens

By Douglas Birch

The assault on Pelindaba

By Douglas Birch and R. Jeffrey Smith

South Africa rebuffs repeated U.S. demands that it relinquish its nuclear explosives

By Douglas Birch and R. Jeffrey Smith

U.S. efforts to stem 'extreme threat to global security' far from complete

By Douglas Birch and R. Jeffrey Smith

Secrets got loose at nuclear weapons laboratory, an auditor says

By Douglas Birch

Obama proposes to boost spending for nuclear armaments

By Douglas Birch

Advisory panel tells Congress the nuclear weapons complex is too big and too old

By Douglas Birch

The 47-year-old nuclear elephant in the room

By Douglas Birch and R. Jeffrey Smith

DOE official seeks probe of dissident analyst’s dismissal by nuclear weapons laboratory

By Douglas Birch

Fired Los Alamos nuclear expert files appeal

By Douglas Birch

U.S. now faces threat of U.S.-made weapons in Iraq

By Douglas Birch

Nuclear weapons lab employee fired after publishing scathing critique of the arms race

By Douglas Birch

Obama curbs nuclear security goals as bomb-building budget grows

By Douglas Birch

Energy Dept. confirms it's been on the wrong path since 2007

By Douglas Birch

Dozens of intelligence contractors have submitted false claims for federal funds

By Douglas Birch

Japan reaffirms its plan to produce plutonium

By Douglas Birch and Jake Adelstein

Japan confirms it will return some nuclear explosive materials to U.S.

By Douglas Birch

Improving security for nuclear explosives remains a diplomatic struggle

By Douglas Birch

Plutonium fever blossoms in Japan

Japan could be building an irresistible terrorist target, experts say

Japan agrees to return some plutonium

By Douglas Birch

A world awash in a nuclear explosive?

By Douglas Birch and R. Jeffrey Smith

Nuclear Waste: Energy Department proposes to kill multi-billion dollar nuclear fuel plant

By Douglas Birch and R. Jeffrey Smith

Nuclear Waste: Auditors find continuing mismanagement at nuclear fuel plant

By Douglas Birch

Nuclear Waste: Cost of South Carolina fuel plant goes up by billions of dollars — again

By R. Jeffrey Smith and Douglas Birch

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