Reity O'Brien

Reporter  The Center for Public Integrity

Reity O’Brien is a reporter for the Center's "Consider the Source" money-in-politics coverage, and was the Center’s 16th James R. Soles Fellow. She graduated from University of Delaware in May 2012 with an Honors degree in political science and economics and minors in Spanish and journalism.  She worked for The Review, the university’s student-run newspaper, where she served as city editor and covered Delaware’s turbulent Senate contest in 2010. Reity has been the recipient of awards from the Maryland Delaware DC Press Association and the William P. Frank Scholarship Fund. She has held internships at Fortune Small Business Magazine, The Cecil Whig and The Philadelphia Inquirer

Nonprofits backed winning candidates, or bashed losers, in 63 percent of the state races in which they sponsored ads.

Battles over the U.S. Senate and governorships dominated TV commercial breaks.

Three out of four races won by top spending candidates and their allies

More than two dozen donors have given at least $1 million to state-level campaigns ahead of Nov. 4.

Nonprofits hit TV airwaves with attacks on state-level candidates, gaining traction since the U.S. Supreme Court 'Citizens United' decision.

If you watch TV you've seen an unbelievable number of political ads asking for your vote. Do you know who is paying for those ads, and why?

TV ad spending in state elections since 2010 is down, but the portion ponied up by political nonprofits and state-level super PACs rises.

Nearly all Supreme Court justices reported earning thousands for teaching and book royalties beyond their federal salaries.

Judges acknowledge conflicts of interest Center found in 26 cases.

More than 40 percent of federal appellate judges had portions of financial disclosures blacked out.

A database of investments, outside income, gifts and other disclosures.

See the library of documents we used in our 'Justice Obscured' investigation.

Officials defend limited financial disclosure for high court judges.

We graded 50 states (plus D.C.) on their judicial financial disclosures — how did your state do?

See the nine justices we found who ruled on their own financial interests.

The Center's methodology for grading states on supreme court financial disclosure

Despite universally poor disclosure rules, Center finds numerous conflicts among state high court judges.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

We graded each state on judicial financial disclosure.

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