Workplace deaths up slightly in 2011

By Jim Morris

Worker deaths rose slightly in 2011, though the jobsite fatality rate fell, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports.

Excerpts from this story referencing "Occupational Safety and Health Administration":

"… o workers. In a report this week, O’Connor’s group recommends that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration issue a sweeping injury and illness prevention standard that would require …"

'They were not thinking of him as a human being'

By Jim Morris and Chip Mitchell

A chemical discharge in a Chicago-area factory kills a worker — and exposes the dangers faced by temp workers across the U.S.

Excerpts from this story referencing "Michigan":

"… olations,” said David Uhlmann, a law professor at the University of Michigan and former chief of the Justice Department’s Environmental Crimes Sectio …"

Kentucky death case: Another black eye for state workplace safety enforcement

By Jim Morris

Kentucky's deletion of all violations in worker death case criticized by victim's family, feds.

Excerpts from this story referencing "chief":

"… asure the effectiveness of state programs. In his response to the IG, OSHA chief David Michaels wrote that the agency was developing a new monitoring syste …"

In U.S. Steel town, fatal gas explosion goes unpunished by OSHA

By Jim Morris

The 2009 death of Nick Revetta exposes flaws in the system designed to protect American workers.

Excerpts from this story referencing "Boeing":

"… who die annually of work-related diseases and it’s as if a fully loaded Boeing 737-700 crashed every day. Yet the typical fine for a worker death is abou …"

Fatal work injuries rose in 2010, new data show

By Jim Morris

The Department of Labor reported that 4,690 U.S. workers suffered fatal injuries in 2010, a 3 percent increase from 2009.

Excerpts from this story referencing "Occupational Safety and Health Act":

"… that reality continues to drive the work of the Labor Department. When the Occupational Safety and Health Act was passed in 1970, the National Safety Council estimated that 14,000 work …"

Lame duck Congress may consider bill to toughen OSHA

By Jim Morris

For an agency so widely feared and demonized by American business, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is a relative pushover.

Excerpts from this story referencing "Occupational Safety and Health Act":

"… than six months in prison and a maximum fine of $10,000, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. Under environmental law, knowingly exposing someone to hazardous …"

"… data reviewed by the AFL-CIO, only 79 cases have been prosecuted under the Occupational Safety and Health Act in the past 40 years; the defendants served a combined 89 months in prison …"

OSHA’s laissez-faire attitude

By The Center for Public Integrity

Since 2001, funding cuts at OSHA have been mirrored by a drop in the enforcement budget for the agency