SLIDESHOW: A day in the life of a SuperShuttle driver

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SuperShuttle driver Okieriete Enajekpo doesn’t know how much work he’ll get each day because the company considers him a franchisee not an employee. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

Okieriete Enajekpo logs into the SuperShuttle system at 6:00am to bid for his first job of the day. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

Okieriete Enajekpo displays the map of the zones for passengers at SuperShuttle. He’s only allowed to bid on jobs that start within 15 miles of where he is. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

Okieriete Enajekpo sets an alarm to remind himself when his next job starts. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

Okieriete Enajekpo waits for his pick up time in Prince George’s County, Md. This morning he’s got two passengers to pick up. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

SuperShuttle decides when to offer customers discounts but drivers like Okieriete Enajekpo are the ones who lose money as a result. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

Okieriete Enajekpo drives his two passengers to Baltimore-Washington International Airport. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

Okieriete Enajekpo unloads bags from his van for a passenger. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

A SuperShuttle driver passes the time while waiting for a job using his laptop in his van. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

SuperShuttle provides drivers these resting areas in the parking lot near BWI airport. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

Okieriete Enajekpo and another driver wait for a job in the parking lot of Starbucks near BWI airport. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

Okieriete Enajekpo shows a chart he keeps of the hours he’s on the job. He says he routinely works more than 12, often 18 hours, to get enough money. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity

Okieriete Enajekpo fills up his gas tank before taking his second — and last — group of passengers for the day. The cost: $75.31. 

Emma Schwartz/Center for Public Integrity