Two new board members join Center for Public Integrity

Former New York Times Washington bureau chief and Vice President with MacArthur Foundation latest additions

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The Center for Public Integrity is pleased to welcome two prominent new members to its Board of Directors.

Elspeth Revere boasts of a long career in philanthropy, which includes her distinguished tenure directing the MacArthur Foundation's support for journalism and media.  In December 2015 she retired as Vice President for Media, Culture and Special Initiatives at MacArthur after 24 years of service. Her work has been devoted to using philanthropic tools to support civil society initiatives and organizations.  She has most recently focused on strengthening American democracy and supporting a set of public interest news organizations, including those that conduct deep investigative reporting, nourish a vibrant arts community in Chicago, and produce documentary films on social issues that educate their audiences and inspire action.  Her earlier work addressed human rights, copyright in the digital age, and community service for young people.  She started her career as a city planner in Chicago, her home town.

“Elspeth is one of the most experienced philanthropic leaders working in media and we are fortunate to have her expertise now available to the Center,” said Chief Executive Office Peter Bale.   

Meanwhile, former New York Times Washington bureau chief Bill Kovach is returning to the Board. Kovach, a journalist and writer for more than 60 years, began his career the Johnson City (Tennessee) Press-Chronicle in 1956. From 1960 until 1967 he was a reporter for The Nashville Tennessean, where he covered the civil rights movement, Southern politics and Appalachian poverty. Following a journalism fellowship at Stanford University, Kovach joined The New York Times in 1968. He spent a total of  18 years at The Times, the last eight—from 1979 to 1986—managing the paper’s operations in the nation’s capital.  He later served as executive editor of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution for two years, during which time the paper won two Pulitzer Prizes and was nominated for seven others.

“Bill is a legend and we’re lucky to have him back on the Board to add to the journalistic weight guiding the Center,” said Peter Bale.

Kovach and Revere are the latest in a number of recent additions to the Center for Public Integrity Board of Directors—including Richard Lobo, former Director of the International Broadcasting Bureau, and Ninan Chacko, the CEO of Travel Leaders Group, former CEO of PR Newswire.

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