Michael Hudson

Senior Editor  International Consortium of Investigative Journalists

Michael Hudson is a senior editor at ICIJ. His two decades of work on mortgage and banking fraud has prompted media critics to call him the reporter "who beat the world on subprime abuses" and the "guru of all things predatory lending." He previously worked as a reporter for the Wall Street Journal and as an investigator for the Center for Responsible Lending. Hudson has also written for Forbes, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and Mother Jones. His work has won many honors, including a George Polk Award for magazine reporting, a John Hancock Award for business journalism and accolades from the National Press Club, the White House Correspondents’ Association, the American Bar Association and the New York State Society of CPAs. He edited the award-winning book Merchants of Misery and appeared in the documentary film Maxed Out. His latest book, THE MONSTER: How a Gang of Predatory Lenders and Wall Street Bankers Fleeced America—and Spawned a Global Crisis, was named 2010 Book of the Year by Baltimore City Paper and called "essential reading for anyone concerned with the mortgage crisis" by Library Journal. His recent series of stories for the Center, "The Great Mortgage Cover-Up," has been selected to appear in Columbia University Press's Best Business Writing, 2012.

Inside Countrywide, a ‘counseling meeting’ then termination

By Michael Hudson

'Occupy Wall Street' aims ire at foreclosures

By Michael Hudson

Countrywide loan underwriter found herself in ‘dangerous territory’

By Michael Hudson

Mortgage industry tanks, fraud continues at Countrywide

By Michael Hudson

Countrywide protected fraudsters by silencing whistleblowers, say former employees

By Michael Hudson

Mortgage industry whistleblower wins case against Bank of America

By Michael Hudson

Grassley says IRS whistleblower program needs more resources

By Michael Hudson

Obama's new plan for underwater mortgages may be too little too late

By Michael Hudson

FBI brags about chasing down mortgage fraudsters but big banks are left untouched

By Michael Hudson

Corporate informants could reap big windfalls for exposing fraud

By Michael Hudson

S&P not shy about using its clout politically

By Michael Hudson and Aaron Mehta

As housing crisis festers, mortgage servicers spend $8 million on political contributions

By Michael Hudson and Aaron Mehta

Stock market plunge shows need for tough oversight of financial system, reformers say

By Michael Hudson

U.S. stock market plunge followed Financial Stability Oversight Council warning

By Michael Hudson

FTC examines car sales, financing abuses targeting U.S. troops

By Michael Hudson

Bank-backed House lawmakers try to kill IRS plan to identify $1 trillion in foreign accounts

By Michael Hudson

Borrower Nightmares: Soldiers battle car dealers over inflated prices, loan terms

By Michael Hudson

Storefront payday lenders criticize online rivals for affiliating with Indian tribes

By Michael Hudson

Less than 2 percent of 'Sarbox' corporate whistleblowers win inside federal bureaucracy

By Michael Hudson

IRS red tape, old guard slow whistleblowing on corporate tax cheats

By Michael Hudson

Judge throws out tech executive's whistleblower claim against Bank of America

By Michael Hudson

Battle over corporate whistleblower rules won't end with SEC vote

By Michael Hudson

In setback for corporate lobbyists, whistleblowers can take tips first to government investigators

By Michael Hudson

Bankers, consumer groups clash over IRS plan to crack down on foreign tax cheats

By Michael Hudson

As IRS crusades against Americans hiding money offshore, Latin American tax cheats flock to U.S. banks

By Michael Hudson

Book Review: A rising tide of white-collar lies

By Michael Hudson

Data shows Deutsche Bank was key patron of questionable mortgage lenders

By Michael Hudson

Jury: Quicken Loans doesn't owe overtime pay to former employees

By Michael Hudson

Will Washington pull the plug on HAMP?

By Michael Hudson

Judge orders Quicken Loans to pay $2.7 million award in West Virginia fraud case

By Michael Hudson

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